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Seaworld records over 35,000 marine rescues

13th June 2019 - 7:08pm

Seaworld records over 35,000 marine rescues

Seaworld records over 35,000 marine rescues

After Fifty-Five Years and more than 35,000 Rescues, SeaWorld experts reveal threats to marine wildlife are accelerating.

 

Since 1964, the same year SeaWorld first opened its gates, SeaWorld’s rescue teams have been on the frontlines of giving ill, injured, orphaned or abandoned animals a second chance at life. On Friday 7th June, SeaWorld Parks & Entertainment announced that SeaWorld Rescue has now come to the aid of more than 35,000 marine and terrestrial animals in its 55-year history. Trends in rescue data suggest that the impact of human activity on our oceans, such as plastic pollution, is taking an increasing toll on marine wildlife in recent years.

 

“As an organisation, we want to get to a place where we conduct fewer rescue operations, not more, but right now there are a lot of ill, distressed or stranded wild animals in need,” said Jon (JP) Peterson, Senior Leader of Zoological Operations at SeaWorld Orlando, who has personally assisted thousands of distressed animals”.

 

“We’re not there yet, but there’s much more awareness now of the impact that humans are having on the ocean’s health and the animals that live in the ocean than there was when I started on the rescue team, and that gives us hope. Part of SeaWorld’s mission is to increase awareness and education of the true impact humans are having on our oceans and the detrimental effects on marine wildlife”.

 

SeaWorld cites changes in sea surface temperatures, urban development and resulting habitat loss, along with ocean pollution, as primary causes and concerns impacting marine wildlife. According to SeaWorld Rescue data, for example, approximately half of the manatees rescued along Florida’s coast since 2015 were in danger from human-impacted activities, including paralysis caused by cold stress or red tide as seawater temperatures dramatically change with the climate, injuries caused by boat strikes, or entanglement in marine debris.

 

“For SeaWorld, our commitment to conservation runs deeper than saving a single animal on a beach,” said Peterson. “We want to save and support their entire species, the ecosystem that they live in, and the food sources that they feed on”.

 

To grow awareness of the threats facing wildlife, the company also launched a new SeaWorld Rescue channel on Instagram ahead of World Oceans Day that tells the story of rescue, rehabilitation and release, as seen through the eyes of those on the frontlines of saving animals.


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Seaworld records over 35,000 marine rescues
Seaworld records over 35,000 marine rescues
Seaworld records over 35,000 marine rescues

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